Item Creation

Here contains the guidelines for crafting items.

Crafting Melee Weapons

Price: In order to make a weapon, you must purchase materials equal to half the cost of the weapon you are trying to make. Some weapons require specialty materials that can’t be acquired everywhere. But as long as you have at least 50% of the required materials, you can begin work up until 50% of the successes.
Time: Each session of crafting takes 8 hours. One/No Handed weapons have a base Successes needed of 6 and Two Handed weapons a base of 10. Primitive weapons multiply the value by 1, Shock by 1.5, Chain by 2, Power by 4, and Exotic weapons range from 2 to 4. For Primitive weapons of Rare availability or higher, multiply the time further by 1.5. This is more of a guideline than a hard-and-fast rule. If the GM wishes for something to take longer or shorter, then it does.
Knowledge: For Primitive, Shock, and Chain weapons, training in Trade (Armourer) contains knowledge in how to craft these weapons. Power weapons require Trade (Armourer) + 10. Having Trade (Armourer) + 20 allows the crafter to begin to augment designs with Craftsmanships, though those will alter time and cost as well. Exotic weapons will depend largely on how alien or complex they are, and will be rated on a GM basis.
Test: Tests are made in 8 hour intervals with a + 0 Trade (Armourer) check. They can be assisted as well. Someone trained can make their own tests to combine successes, while a simple go-fer assistant grants a bonus degree of success as the crafter is able to work faster. Count the total number of successes towards finishing the item. Failure results in backsliding, losing a number of successes equal to half of the degrees of failure. Failure by 4 degrees, though, results in a complete failure, requiring parts to be replaced and to start over. 1d50 + 25% of the parts are salvageable, and if enough parts remain, work can begin anew before you need to acquire the rest.

Crafting Ranged Weapons

Price: In order to make a weapon, you must purchase materials equal to half the cost of the weapon you are trying to make. Some weapons require specialty materials that can’t be acquired everywhere. But as long as you have at least 50% of the required materials, you can begin work up until 50% of the successes.
Time: Each session of crafting takes 8 hours. Pistols have a base Successes needed of 10, Basic weapons 15, Heavy weapons 25, and Ordnance weapons 40. Solid Projectile and Primitive weapons multiply the value by 1, Las by 1.25, Bolt and Flame by 1.5, Melta and Plasma by 2, and Exotic weapons range from 1.5 to 2.5. For Solid Projectile and Las weapons of Rare availability or higher, multiply the time further by 1.5. This is more of a guideline than a hard-and-fast rule. If the GM wishes for something to take longer or shorter, then it does.
Knowledge: For Solid Projectile, Las, Primitive, and Flame weapons, training in Trade (Armourer) contains knowledge in how to craft these weapons. Bolt, Melta, and Plasma weapons require Trade (Armourer) + 10. Having Trade (Armourer) + 20 allows the crafter to begin to augment designs with Craftsmanships, though those will alter time and cost as well. Exotic weapons will depend largely on how alien or complex they are, and will be rated on a GM basis.
Test: Tests are made in 8 hour intervals with a + 0 Trade (Armourer) check. They can be assisted as well. Someone trained can make their own tests to combine successes, while a simple go-fer assistant grants a bonus degree of success as the crafter is able to work faster. Count the total number of successes towards finishing the item. Failure results in backsliding, losing a number of successes equal to half of the degrees of failure. Failure by 4 degrees, though, results in a complete failure, requiring parts to be replaced and to start over. 1d50 + 25% of the parts are salvageable, and if enough parts remain, work can begin anew before you need to acquire the rest.

Crafting Armour

Price: In order to make armour, you must purchase materials equal to half the cost of the armour you are trying to make. Some armour requires specialty materials that can’t be acquired everywhere. But as long as you have at least 50% of the required materials, you can begin work up until 50% of the successes.
Time: Each session of crafting takes 8 hours. Each piece of armour has it’s own base number. Head is 5, Arms and Legs are 7.5, Body is 10, but if a whole suit is being made at once, it’s base is 18. Primitive multiplies the base by 1, Flak and Mesh by 1.25, Carapace and Void Suits by 1.5, and Advanced by 2. Force Fields require a number of successes equal to half their Rating + 5.
Knowledge: For Primitive, Flak, and Void Suits, training in Trade (Armourer) is sufficient. Mesh, Carapace, and Advance require Trade (Armourer) + 10. Trade (Armourer) + 20 allows the crafter to apply different craftsmanships as allowed.
Test: Tests are made in 8 hour intervals with a + 0 Trade (Armourer) check. They can be assisted as well. Someone trained can make their own tests to combine successes, while a simple go-fer assistant grants a bonus degree of success as the crafter is able to work faster. Count the total number of successes towards finishing the item. Failure results in backsliding, losing a number of successes equal to half of the degrees of failure. Failure by 4 degrees, though, results in a complete failure, requiring parts to be replaced and to start over. 1d50 + 25% of the parts are salvageable, and if enough parts remain, work can begin anew before you need to acquire the rest.

Crafting Other Gear

The rules located above can be used as a guideline for making other items. Things like common gear and tools might not take too long or be complex, while drugs and explosives could be time consuming or prone to failure. This can even be taken up to the larges scale, crafting/designing voidcraft components. These tests will be largely up to the GM, but will usually involve their relevant skills and require a minimum expenditure of funds equal to half of the cost of the item being made. Armourer works for most things combat related, Shipwright handles most things voidcraft related, and Medicae covers most things medicine and drug related. The GM is the final arbiter on these craft checks.

Crafted Item Quality

The quality of a crafted item is largely dependent on the amount of time spent on it. When 75% of the successes have been accrued, work can stop on the item, though it results in a Poor quality, though it can be Refurbished later. Stopping on time results in a Common quality item. If an additional 25% successes are made, continuing to work past the finished mark, then the item is of Good quality. Best quality items are usually made over a very long time, or are a happenstance of luck. If it’s worked out, it requires an additional 50% successes after the Common quality mark. Alternatively, if they reach the Good quality mark
and had any natural 01’s or at least two tests that resulted in 4+ degrees of success (not counting an assistant or similar increase) then item is of Best quality.

Refurbishing

Sometimes, items just get jammed up too much or aren’t taken care of and start to degrade. Luckily, there is a way to combat this. If an Explorer knows whey they are doing, they can examine and fix a weapon that has gone into disrepair.

If a weapon is of Poor quality, it can be refurbished to bring it back up to standard functioning. This follows the rules for crafting the item in question, but it only requires 25% of the weapon’s cost in parts and only half as many total successes. However, the weapon cannot be finished early to result in Poor quality, that’s where it started! A Broken weapon can be treated the same way, though it still costs 50% of the base cost in parts.

Note: Refurbishing cannot normally remove Downgrades from items. The Explorator’s starting specialty weapon is the only exception to this.

Scrapping

Occasionally, the best way to make something is to take disparate parts of multiple things, sort out what’s best, and then work from there. As such, it is possible to take unwanted weapons and break them down to use in other projects.
Time: The amount of time it takes to break a weapon down is based largely on it’s condition. Any Broken weapon can be salvaged in a handful of hours, since broken pieces don’t necessarily need to be handled with care. A Poor quality weapon takes 4 hours as more care has to be taken as more parts are useful. Any other quality of weapon requires a full 8 hours to properly disassemble and store it’s pieces. If it is a Heavy ranged weapon, double the time it takes. If it is a Power or Plasma weapon or a Force Field, double the time it takes as great care needs to be taken to preserve sensitive parts.
Salvage: A Broken item will return one eighth of it’s base value and be destroyed. A Poor Quality item will return a quarter of it’s value and be destroyed. Any better quality item will return half it’s base value in salvage, but it can be reversed at any time before completion if the parts are kept track of.

The salvage you generate needs to be kept separate from each other for calculating what you can put towards a weapon. You can’t build a Plasma Cannon out of a bunch of Stub Revolver parts. You can cross up to 50% of the funds you need from other sources, but half of the cost must purchased or come from the same kind of salvage. The GM is the final arbiter on what can be mixed and matched with what.

Item Creation

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